Enjoy Midwest scenery year-round with my new 2018 pictorial calendar

October 29, 2017

Soon 2018 will be here, and I already know what I want the coming year to look like. I want a year filled with peace, beauty and hope. Yet I know the coming year will also have its share of natural disasters, terrorist attacks, political strife and other unsettling events.

Even so, I believe that whatever we focus on expands. That’s why I have purposefully selected scenic, peaceful and inspiring photos for my pictorial calendar. That’s what I want for 2018.

Printed on study, high-quality card stock, the 11″ x 8.5″ calendars are spiral-bound and hole-punched, making them easy to hang in your home, office or another special place.

The new pictorial calendars just arrived and I’m now taking orders.

If you are interested, I’d suggest you order early. Last year I sold out two printings of the calendar and then regretfully had to turn away a few last-minute requests.

Many people purchased extra calendars to give to family members, college students away from home, business contacts and friends. One man bought a calendar for his parents living in England. Another family sent a calendar to Italy for the parents of an exchange student living with them.

Each month features a full-page colorful photo I took around the Kansas City area. The pictures include scenic landscapes, city skylines, historic landmarks, seasonal colors and the natural beauty of the Great Midwest.

The format of the large, monthly calendar allows you to mark birthdays, remember anniversaries, plan vacations and schedule other important events.

Reasonably priced at $19.95, each calendar can be shipped anywhere in the United States for an additional $4.60 to cover mailing.

To order, please:

  1. Click on this PayPal link: 2018 Calendar
  2. Email your postal address to me at duane@duanehallock.com so I can get your calendar to you right away.

You may also pay using Facebook Messenger if that is more convenient than PayPal.

As we approach the new year, I’m reminded of what the famed photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson once said: “Photographers deal in things which are continually vanishing and when they have vanished there is no contrivance on earth which can make them come back again.”

Although 2017 will soon be just a memory, I hope we can carry forward the beauty and joy we have experienced this year.

Thank you!

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Being Organized in the New Era of Google

February 8, 2011

Seldom do I read every page of a book, but I just devoured every page of Getting Organized in the Google Era, an excellent book written by Douglas C. Merrill, the former chief information officer of Google.

Don’t be put off by its title—it’s not as nerdy as it sounds. My advice: Do yourself a huge favor and read this if you are still old-fashioned enough to:

  1. Use Microsoft Outlook to send and receive e-mail.
  2. Keep your appointments in an Outlook calendar.
  3. Store most of your important documents on the hard drive of your computer.
  4. Fear using “the cloud” for e-mail, calendar and document storage.
  5. Have no clue what is meant by the term “in the cloud.”

The very next book you should read. Trust me!

I don’t mean to be melodramatic or condescending, but I strongly believe we are veering towards obsolescence if we are still anchored to Outlook or to a Franklin-Covey planner for either our personal or work calendars. I also think we are seriously outmoded if we believe that the best way to organize our e-mails is to drag them from our inboxes into a hierarchy of folders and subfolders. In our globally-connected world, I can’t imagine anyone being unable to access his or her calendar, e-mail or documents from a smartphone or a computer.

To change ingrained habits we must start thinking differently. This exceptionally insightful book will help to change the way we think about the world. Just so you’ll know, this is not merely a book adulating the wonders of Google. Rather, the author describes ways to handle the blurring of our personal & professional lives. He talks about letting strategy drive our day-to-day decisions around tactics. He provides useful tips for customizing any organizational system to fit our personal needs, readily admitting that one size does not fit all.

To tease you into buying the book today, allow me to share these brief excerpts:

  1. In an era of widespread, inexpensive communications, knowledge simply spreads too rapidly for it to hold power for long. So there’s no point in trying to cram a ton of it into your head. A much better strategy is to have a system for storing and organizing knowledge so you can access or recall it when you need it.
  2. Because of search, you no longer have to neatly organize all your information the way you would with physical files, with a place for everything and everything in its place. Search is the foundation of the organizational systems we need today.
  3. The best e-mail system is the one that lets me quickly sort and search through years of messages. It’s accessible from any computer or any Internet-connect phone. It’s the one that’s easiest to use and has a huge amount of free storage, so I never have to delete old messages to make room for new ones. It excels at filtering out spam. That’s Gmail.

Your next steps are:  a) buy and read the book, b) underline key points and c) let me know what you think.


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